One Extra Link that I forgot to add to my post on Mental Health and Social Media

Mauricio Delgado, associate professor of psychology at Rutgers University, explained to Marketing News in 2014 that social media activity—likes, retweets, comments—activates the brain’s reward center in the same way as a hug, smile or compliment.

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Mental Health and Social Media Part 3 : In which I learn that Social Media Platforms are Designed to be Addictive!

This is the 3rd and final part of my triple-threat post on Mental Health and Social Media. *Phew* You can find the previous part here. With no introduction I’ll jump right in!

Continue reading Mental Health and Social Media Part 3 : In which I learn that Social Media Platforms are Designed to be Addictive!

Mental Health and Social Media Part 1: Some reading that I did over break

Hold onto your hats because this post is a long-winded doozy. And I broke it up into two three parts!

Hi, I hope that you had a good holiday. Over my holiday break I found myself reading articles and thinking more about the themes of mental health and social media. I’ve been doing so much thinking about this that I wanted to take some time to share some of what I’ve read here.

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Erving Goffman, Sociology, and Impression Management

The way I act with my family is very different than the way I behave when I’m hanging out with my friends. For instance, when I’m with my friends I’ll cuss like a sailor (among other things haha). Even worse, if I’m hanging out with my friends in the math department I might try and take extra care to not say stupid math things so that nobody will think I’m incompetent or dumb.

But does this mean I’m being fake to my family and to my friends? And in a math department where graduate students worry about the Imposter syndrome, is there a precise way to describe my habits of impression management?

I turned to dramaturgical theory of social interaction for the answer.

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My 1 Minute Fast Take on the Nash Embedding Theorem and Convex Integration

A terrific buddy of mine recently asked me if I’ve ever gone back to study the original Nash and Embedding theorems on which Convex Integration for fluids is based on. The short answer is sadly no 😦 but I did have things to say about the original Nash and embedding theorem anyways ( LOL). I wasted no time in inundating my friend with my thoughts on this. Fortunately he’s a very patient guy.

But in writing that email I found a survey article that I think this great job explaining the connection so I wanted to share it here along with my own thoughts on this.

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